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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 602-606

Knowledge and attitude of family physicians, pediatricians, and otolaryngologists as regards pediatric acute bacterial rhinosinsuitis guidelines in Menoufia


1 Otolaryngology Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menofia University, Shebin Elkom, Menoufia, Egypt
2 Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menofia University, Shebin Elkom, Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Heba A Salman
Shebin el-Kom, Menoufia, 32511
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.215456

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Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and the attitude of family physicians, pediatricians, and otolaryngologists as regards different guidelines of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis(ABRS) management in children and causes of nonadherence to them. Background Clinical practice guidelines have been promoted as a strategy to improve the quality of patient care. However, more efforts had been expended on creating guidelines rather than on implementing them. Methods The study was a cross-sectional one. The study sample included physicians from different specialities dealing with cases of ABRS. The sample included participants from different departments(family medicine, pediatrics, and otolaryngology) from the list of attendees of related conferences. They were selected using systematic random techniques. Every third person from the list was selected. The study included 67 family physicians, 23 otolaryngologists, and 28 pediatricians. They were evaluated using a predesigned questionnaire, which included items related to diagnosis, investigations, and treatment modalities. According to their response they were classified as follows: well adherent and poorly adherent. Results The study revealed that there was no difference between different specialties as regards adherence to guidelines. Age and qualifications did not affect their adherence. Family physicians and pediatricians showed greater adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America guideline and otolaryngologists showed greater adherence to Canadian. The main causes of nonadherence were the delay in renewing guidelines and ambiguous recommendations. Conclusion The overall knowledge and attitude as regards guidelines of ABRS between different specialties was poor. Age and qualifications did not affect the adherence to guidelines. The main causes of nonadherence were lack of applicability and ambiguous recommendations.


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